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Resources

Resources are components within Benthos that are declared with a unique label and can be referenced any number of times within a configuration. Only one instance of each named resource is created, but it is safe to use it in multiple places as they can be shared without consequence.

Some components such as caches and rate limits can only be created as a resource. However, for components where it's optional there are a few reasons why it might be advantageous to do so.

input:
resource: foo
pipeline:
processors:
- resource: bar
- cache:
operator: set
resource: baz
key: ${! json("id") }
value: ${! content() }
output:
resource: buz
input_resources:
- label: foo
file:
paths: [ ./in.txt ]
processor_resources:
- label: bar
bloblang: 'root = content.lowercase()'
cache_resources:
- label: baz
memory:
ttl: 300
output_resources:
- label: buz
file:
path: ./out.txt

Reusability#

Sometimes it's necessary to use a rather large component multiple times. Instead of copy/pasting the configuration or using YAML anchors you can define your component as a resource.

In the following example we want to make an HTTP request with our payloads. Occasionally the payload might get rejected due to garbage within its contents, and so we catch these rejected requests, attempt to "cleanse" the contents and try to make the same HTTP request again. Since the HTTP request component is quite large (and likely to change over time) we make sure to avoid duplicating it by defining it as a resource get_foo:

pipeline:
processors:
- resource: get_foo
- catch:
- bloblang: |
root = this
root.content = this.content.strip_html()
- resource: get_foo
processor_resources:
- label: get_foo
http:
url: http://example.com/foo
verb: POST
headers:
SomeThing: "set-to-this"
SomeThingElse: "set-to-something-else"

Feature Toggling#

With Environment Variables#

There are two ways of using resources for feature toggling, the first is to define your feature components with unique names and then apply the old switcheroo with environment variables to select the one you wish to execute:

pipeline:
processors:
- resource: ${FEATURE_REQUEST}
processor_resources:
- label: get_foo
http:
url: http://example.com/foo
verb: POST
headers:
SomeThing: "set-to-this"
SomeThingElse: "set-to-something-else"
- label: get_bar
http:
url: http://example.com/bar
verb: PUT
headers:
Desires: "are-empty"

Then when you execute Benthos use the environment variable to choose your resource: FEATURE_REQUEST=get_foo benthos -c ./your_config.yaml.

With Imports#

However, Benthos allows you to import resources from separate files with the cli flag -r or -resources, which can be a useful way to switch out resources with common names based on your chosen environment. For example, with a main configuration file config.yaml:

pipeline:
processors:
- resource: get_foo

And then two resource files, one stored at the path ./staging/request.yaml:

processor_resources:
- label: get_foo
http:
url: http://example.com/foo
verb: POST
headers:
SomeThing: "set-to-this"
SomeThingElse: "set-to-something-else"

And another stored at the path ./production/request.yaml:

processor_resources:
- label: get_foo
http:
url: http://example.com/bar
verb: PUT
headers:
Desires: "are-empty"

We can select our chosen resource by changing which file we import, either running:

benthos -r ./staging/request.yaml -c ./config.yaml

Or:

benthos -r ./production/request.yaml -c ./config.yaml

These flags also support wildcards, which allows you to import an entire directory of resource files like benthos -r "./staging/*.yaml" -c ./config.yaml.